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Shutterbug Life podcast

Shutterbug Life is a weekly podcast that celebrates the creative photographer's lifestyle. Through a series of discussions, expert interviews, and photo challenges, the podcast examines everything you need to be, do, or have to reach your full photographic potential. Episodes are designed to be helpful no matter where you are on your learning path. Shutterbug Life podcast is hosted by Lynford Morton, a second-generation photographer who build one of Washington, DC’s fastest growing photography Meetup communities, Shutterbug Excursions. He has also trained thousands of photographers to take great pictures in Washington, DC and New Orleans from the business he founded, PhotoTour Excursions. Now he recreates the community of enthusiast photographers with Shutterbug Life.
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Now displaying: May, 2015
May 31, 2015

If you wandered into Baltimore's Helping Up Mission last Dec. 6, you might have thought you were in a photo studio. Rows of portrait stations lined the room, all staffed by photographers busy shooting and printing images. 

And if you really paid attention, you'd notice that no money was being exchanged. That's right, photographers were shooting high quality portraits — free — for people who normally might never have experienced that kind of attention.

Wes Linda was one of the organizers of the Help-Portrait Baltimore movement, and he joins this episode to share what he learned, and how you can change your own world with your camera.

 

Listen to the podcast or visit the show notes at bit.ly/shutterbuglife022.

May 26, 2015

I have some photography advice for you. It has nothing to do with f-stops or apertures, composition or storytelling. Sure those principles are important, but they aren't my focus today.

This advice will not only help you improve your photographs but your life as a photographer. Use them today. Use them years from now. They'll still work.

Put down your camera and pull up a chair. Here we go.

Listen to the podcast and find the show notes at bit.ly/021

May 18, 2015

"Hi, Joe McNally? You don't know me, but I'm Lyn Morton. I'm a big fan of your work, but even more so, I love the way you teach. You see, I'm also a photographer and photo coach. I was wondering if you would be my mentor.

"Why would you do that? What's in it for you?!

"Good questions...." Hmmm...

If you've ever imagined asking someone to be your photography mentor and feared the conversation would end like that, Peggy Farren has some tips for you.

Peggy is a portrait and wedding photographer in Naples, Fla. She joins us today to make the case that you need a photography mentor or even a photo buddy, and she has seven tips to help you you find one.

 

Listen to the podcast and read the show notes at bit.ly/shutterbuglife020.

May 11, 2015

Valerie Jardin is still modest enough to correct me when I refer to her as an expert on street photography, but it' not that she hasn't earned the title.

I love her quote, "photography is my passion, my obsession, my addiction. I live and breathe in pixels!"

Valerie is a natural a storyteller who focuses mostly street photography. 

Her work has hung in galleries in the United States and in Europe, but she enjoys paying it forward most.

"Teaching is my opportunity to share my passion and skills with others while leading photography workshops," she writes. "I also give talks and presentations at photo conferences and offer online portfolio reviews and business consultations."

I know Valerie as the host of the weekly street photography podcast, Street Focus, and writer for Digital Photography School magazine.

In this interview, I ask Valerie:

  • What's her definition of street photography?
  • What is seeing in street photography, and how do you do it?
  • What are you looking for when you are shooting?
  • Who inspires you?
  • Top three tips for beginners?
  • How do you approach shooting in other countries?

Listen to the podcast and find the show notes at bit.ly/shutterbuglife019.

May 3, 2015

I'm going to ask you to look at the images of last week's Baltimore unrest again.

I'm making a few assumption here. One, that you've seen the big news story carried wall to wall by most news organizations. Two, that you saw them through the lenses of your humanity or politics. I'm going to assume you saw the destruction and mayhem and felt something — outrage, compassion, fear, sadness. Something.

Now I'm going to ask you to look at the images with me — as artists.

That's what I did when I looked at the Boston Globe's photo story, "Unrest in Baltimore." The photographers put in some really significant work. The images are powerful, emotional,  and artistic.

Maybe you see something different. I'll tell you what I saw. I recorded a screencast where I react to the art of all the images.

Then, in this week's podcast, I discuss what photographers can learn from the Baltimore images. In the podcast, I also replay the takeaways from the Crisis Photography webinar we did a couple years ago, right after the Boston bombing. It's worth a review as we consider this topic.

In the comments, tell me what the artist in you sees in these images. I'd love to read your insights.

Listen to the podcast here. Watch the bonus screencast on the website at bit.ly/shutterbuglife018.

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