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Shutterbug Life podcast

Shutterbug Life is a weekly podcast that celebrates the creative photographer's lifestyle. Through a series of discussions, expert interviews, and photo challenges, the podcast examines everything you need to be, do, or have to reach your full photographic potential. Episodes are designed to be helpful no matter where you are on your learning path. Shutterbug Life podcast is hosted by Lynford Morton, a second-generation photographer who build one of Washington, DC’s fastest growing photography Meetup communities, Shutterbug Excursions. He has also trained thousands of photographers to take great pictures in Washington, DC and New Orleans from the business he founded, PhotoTour Excursions. Now he recreates the community of enthusiast photographers with Shutterbug Life.
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Now displaying: June, 2016
Jun 23, 2016

Let's start with the end first. When I asked Parish Kohanim what advice he would give to a photographer who aspires to make a real impact, his advice was succinct.

"Listen to your own voice... Don't listen to people. They will give you a hundred different opinions that don't speak your voice."

That might seem like easy advice to dispense from a photographer with a resume like Parish has — a commercial photographer for more than 30 years and a Canon Explorer of Light, one of only 40 people in the world with that designation.

 

But there were other voices — a famous fashion designer who told him to give up photography because he had no future in it. And his first college instructors who never liked anything he created. 

That kind of feedback could give even the most confident photographers second thoughts.

You know how the story ends. He proved them all wrong, but how did he get there?

Now let's take the journey.

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Jun 18, 2016

Like so many photographers, I was introduced to photography in a home where cameras were commonplace.

Credit it to nature or nurture, when a child grows up in a home of a photographer, it seems photography comes naturally.

For Father's Day weekend, I wanted to tell the stories of photographers and their fathers.

In part II, I interview Emily Carter, a nature photographer in our community. Emily's dad was a Latin American anthropologist who used his camera to document the lives of Indians in the Andes Mountains. I share the story of Sheldon Katz, who remembers his early life with his dad. Finally, I interview my three boys to see how the third generation of photographers is faring.

Listen to part II.

Jun 18, 2016

Like so many photographers, I was introduced to photography in a home where cameras were commonplace.

Credit it to nature or nurture, when a child grows up in a home of a photographer, it seems photography comes naturally.

For Father's Day weekend, I wanted to tell the stories of photographers and their fathers. My selfish reason, of course, is that I get to interview my dad and share his story.

Listen to Part I

Jun 10, 2016
“What’d you do today?"
 
“Excuse me?” I responded.
 
This wasn’t an innocent or idle question. I’d been fretting to a colleague that I didn’t reach a goal I’d set for myself. Her response was curt and dispassionate.
 
“What’d you do today? What did you do yesterday?” 
 
She never said anything else but just let me live with my own responses.
 
If you want to make a difference with your photography, your degree of success is often found in the actions you took today. And yesterday. It’s your level of effort. It’s your hustle.
 
I was listening to Chase Jarvis interview Levar Burton on the 30 Days of Genius series when Levar dropped this truth bomb.
 
You have to not only be the artist and creator, you have to be the promoter, too. The distributor. The chief bottle washer. You have to sweep up. You have to hustle. You have to hustle. And I believe one’s hustle is a sign of the degree to which one is really passionate about getting it done. So where is your hustle game?
 
Let’s unpack that quote because in it Levar Burton gave us the opportunity, the prescription, and the challenge.
 
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Jun 3, 2016

Karen said she needed to call me with some exciting news, but what she told me broke my heart.

She had an exciting opportunity — a request from a national TV publication to use her photo — and she planned to give her photo away. Karen decided that her photo wasn't worth any money because of her lack of experience and because she shot it with an entry level camera.

I know the feeling because I have thought that myself. This photo can't be worth much because I didn't really work that hard to get it. I don't deserve payment. Fill in your own reasons.

If you have ever nursed one of these seeming innocent untruths, I have three messages for you.

Listen to the podcast.

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